Join 200 hackers at Binghamton University from April 25 to 26 for 24 hours of hacking.

Welcome to the HackBU Hackathon, Binghamton University's first hackathon! We hope you're excited for a great weekend. After 8 p.m. on Friday, all teams are allowed to begin working on their apps. All submissions must be in by 8 p.m. Saturday night.

View full rules

Prizes

$3,984 in prizes

First Place

A Kindle Fire 7" Tablet HD for each team member (up to 4), first place medals, Google swag, plus a $100 team dinner on us.

Second Place

Win a Raspberry Pi Basic Starter Kit for each team member (up to 4), Google swag, second place medals, plus a $75 team dinner on us.

Third Place

Up to four Chromecasts for the winning team and third place medals.

Best Design (Sponsored by Behance)

Win a year of Adobe Creative Cloud from Behance for the best designed hack.

Pebble

Pebble will be giving out up to four Pebble Steel's to the top team that hacks with a Pebble.

SendGrid API

Best use of the SendGrid API will win two SUPABOY's and four games.

WordPress (2)

Automattic will give out Mini Jamboxes for the top use of WordPress.

Devpost Achievements

Submitting to this hackathon could earn you:

Eligibility

  • Teams must be no more than four students.
  • You must be a current student and 18 or over to participate.

Requirements

Build a website, iPhone app, hardware hack, or any neat project in 24 hours. Have fun and learn a thing or two while doing it!

How to enter

Hacking ends at 8 p.m. on Saturday so please submit your hack beforehand!

Judges

Vineet Joglekar

Vineet Joglekar
Bloomberg

Cherie Williams

Cherie Williams
Pebble

Kaushal Parikh

Kaushal Parikh
SendGrid

Shaun Andrews

Shaun Andrews
Automattic

Judging Criteria

  • Execution
    Is the product functional? Does it accomplish its goal? Does it work as is, or does it require additional resources (code or data?) How easy is the product to use? How does the product look and feel? How realistic is the development of the product?
  • Technical Impressiveness
    How technically difficult was the hack to implement? How much did it rely on open source libraries and APIs?
  • Innovation
    Is this a creative solution to a problem? Is this a new solution to a problem? Does the app innovate on design, user experience, or technical solutions?